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All photos in & around Haxby

Showing items 1 to 100 from total of 3,683 items. Ordered by photo # descending.

Photo # Icon Photo Caption Categorisation
188087Photo #188087[Image taken 26.11.22] The Village, Haxby. Street view seems to show dead space here in 2019. I don't know when these racks were installed. This is good practice. They are on the main road - a genuine nudge: you can't miss them; close to shops and cafes and a lit pedestrian crossing; of the Sheffield design and freestanding so no upstand; and well spaced. I learned of their existence via a news story in The Press www.yorkpress.co.uk/news/23104628.haxby-councillor-says-warned-worsening-behaviour/. They are visible in the main image. Haxby feels like a place where cars rule. Racks were installed at the Shopping Centre (building visible in the background) in around October 2017 and they were always busy: # . Other images this cycle parking today: #188088, #188089, #188090, #188091, #188092. Other images cycle parking nearby today: #188093, #188094, #188095, #188096. Rawcliffe park and ride leaflitter: #188097, #188098, Rawcliffe Ings flooding: #188099.Cycle parking:
Good practice
cycleparking
188036Photo #188036[Image taken 27.11.22] Burton Stone Lane (northbound), York. The temporary A-board duplicates the high level (too high?) permanent sign on the other side of the road: Priority over oncoming vehicles. It creates an actual pavement width of 88cm. The usable width is therefore 88 – (50 + 50) = unusable if you have mobility issues or are supporting a vulnerable person of any age, difficult for all. Other image and links nearby today: #188013.Road environment:
Problem
road
188035Photo #188035[Image taken 27.11.22] Burton Stone Lane (looking southbound), York. The temporary A-board obstructs the pavement. There is no drop kerb this side for someone in a mobility scooter, wheelchair, a child on a balance bike, someone with wheeled luggage or a shopper for example to be able to pass the sign and negotiate the kerb. The measures were installed to improve the safety of, among others, pedestrians on Burton Stone Lane. Other image and links nearby today: #188013.Road environment:
Problem
road
188034Photo #188034[Image taken 27.11.22] Burton Stone Lane (looking southbound), York. The temporary A-board is a repetition of the high level (too high?) sign. It restricts the pavement width. Actual width is 100cm but usable width is 100 - (50 + 50) = 0. (Table 5-3: Additional width at fixed objects, LTN 1/20 assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/951074/cycle-infrastructure-design-ltn-1-20.pdf) Other image and links nearby today: #188013.Road environment:
Problem
road
188033Photo #188033[Image taken 27.11.22] Burton Stone Lane, York. Moved bus stop has unsightly temporary barricading which it not doing its job but is creating a substantial trip hazard for people waiting/alighting. Overview of the measures intended to calm the traffic on Burton Stone Lane and links: #187753. Other image and links nearby today: #188013.Road environment:
Problem
road
188032Photo #188032[Image taken 27.11.22] Burton Stone Lane (looking southbound), York. Pavement width and quality meets no standards. Other image and links nearby today: #188013.Road environment:
Problem
road
188030Photo #188030[Image taken 27.11.22] Burton Stone Lane, looking southbound, York. Actual pavement width 105cm. To get the usable width you subtract 20cm from the kerb side ie 85cm. Motorists speed along here. The pedestrian experience is unpleasant at best and hazardous in reality. Other image and links nearby today: #188013.Road environment:
Problem
road
188029Photo #188029[Image taken 27.11.22] Duncombe Barracks, Burton Stone Lane, York. Good practice: the hoardings are informative and contribute positively to the streetscape. Context and links: #188025.Other:
Good practice
general
188025Photo #188025[Image taken 27.11.22] Burton Stone Lane, York. Good practice. Details of the hoardings: #188029. Hoardings discussion and links: #165189. Other image and links nearby today: #188013.Other:
Good practice
general
188022Photo #188022[Image taken 27.11.22] St Luke’s (looking northbound), Burton Stone Lane, York. Good practice from St Luke’s (stlukesyork.org/) - four benches. This stretch of Burton Stone Lane contrasts with the larger properties but furious speeds at the southern end (junction with Bootham/Clifton) and the less well off, commercial northern end, but still with very high speeds, towards Crichton Avenue. A 97-year-old resident who walks to and from the supermarkets on this street says she rests on the benches during her journeys. Other image and links nearby today: #188013.Other:
Good practice
general
188021Photo #188021[Image taken 27.11.22] Burton Stone Lane, junction with Surtees Street, York. Pothole. Dimension: 44cm x 40cm x 4cm deep. Location and links: #188020.Pothole:
Problem
potholes
188020Photo #188020[Image taken 27.11.22] Burton Stone Lane junction with Surtees Street, York. Pothole. Dimensions: #188021. Other image and links nearby today: #188013.Pothole:
Problem
potholes
188019Photo #188019[Image taken 27.11.22] Filey Terrace (looking southbound), York. Scaffolding on no 6. Closeup of this hazard for all pavement users. The apex is at my height – around 5ft.Other:
Problem
general
188018Photo #188018[Image taken 27.11.22] Filey Terrace (looking southbound), York. Scaffolding on no 6. Note the light. But – you wouldn’t be expecting a pavement to be completely obstructed. And if you have no or only limited sight? In any case every one has to walk/wheel into the road to avoid it. As this street is two-way this can mean you have motor vehicles and people cycling approaching from behind. And the carriageway is narrow and speeds are high here. Other images of the scaffolding today and links: #188014.Other:
Problem
general
188017Photo #188017[Image taken 27.11.22] Filey Terrace (looking northbound), York. Scaffolding on no 6. No ‘padding’ (protection) for pedestrians on the uprights, no contrasting colour on the bars, and cross bracing that completely obstructs the pavement. The apex is around 5 feet. There is no light on this side. After dark you can’t see there is an obstruction – a hazard. And if you have limited or no sight? Are seeing dogs so clever they can warn owners of obstructions at height? Other images of the scaffolding today and links: #188014.Other:
Problem
general
188016Photo #188016[Image taken 27.11.22] Filey Terrace (looking northbound), York. Scaffolding on no 2. Close up – note the ‘padding’. Note the vibrant colour of the padding. Note there is no cross bracing and therefore no obstruction at head height. Other images of the scaffolding today and links: #188014.Other:
Good practice
general
188014Photo #188014[Image taken 27.11.22] Filey Terrace, junction with Hudson Street, (looking northbound), York. Scaffolding on no 2. Drop kerb – in the afternoon/evening this corner with its dropped kerb is often parked on. No sight lines. No dropped kerb. Other images of the scaffolding today: #188016, #188017, #188018, #188019. Other image and links nearby today: #188013.Other:
Infrastructure
general
188013Photo #188013[Image taken 27.11.22] Tennyson Avenue, York. Obstructed pavements. Other images nearby today: #188014, #188016, #188017, #188018, #188019, #188020, #188021, #188022, #188025, #188029, #188030, #188032, #188033, #188034, #188035, #188036.Road environment:
Problem
road
187880Photo #187880[Image taken 23.11.22] Deangate junction with College Street, York. Lancelot has appeared on route 658. Context and links: #187750.Other:
Infrastructure
general
187861Photo #187861[Image taken 22.11.22] Burton Stone Lane, southbound. Skid hazard from sand from burst sandbag. York. Context: #187860. Other image here today and links: #187859.Other:
Event
general
187860Photo #187860[Image taken 22.11.22] Burton Stone Lane, York (southbound). Context: #187760. As I cycled south I saw a knot of people including one I recognised as a resident who I had spoken to on Friday. One was a woman. I asked her if her name was the one the residents I had spoken to had said was the scheme designer. She said she was. Some men in hi viz were there too. I pointed out the sign that was almost completely obstructing the entrance to the cycle channel in this image. I pointed out the sand. I received a reply then and subsequently when I spoke to the men in hi viz again, The temporary signs had to be in because the permanent ones had not been installed. They have been installed now.
I said then and repeated it 15 minutes later when I saw them again, Crashes don’t wait until signs have been installed. Drivers don’t need protection. Pedestrians (see: #187796, #187797) and cyclists need protection. Permanent signs need to go in first – with covers over them (see: #186052) – until the scheme is in situ when the covers can come off.
This image shows the sign has been slightly moved so people on cycles can access the channel. But the other hazard – the sand - remained: #187861. (Ahead of my second conversation with the hi viz team, the one who seemed to be the leader was telling another person to remove the sign and clear up the sand.) Look at the wheels of the construction vehicle in the image. They straddle the speed cushion. The driver is not inconvenienced by that piece of infrastructure CYC believes slows driving speeds. Other image here today and links: #187859.
Road environment:
Problem
road
187859Photo #187859[Image taken 22.11.22] Burton Stone Lane, York (looking northbound). ‘Traffic calming’ scheme overview and links: #187753. This driver was parked just ahead of the new 'cycle channel'. If someone on a cycle uses these they are sidelined, have no way of controlling the traffic behind them, they are increased risk of being close passed and intimidated for example by a motorist revving an engine. If someone uses the cycle channel, s/he is hemmed in by a motorist parking/stopping at the 'exit' as here. The person on a cycle has much reduced sight lines of what is happening ahead/when it is safe to pass the stopped vehicle. I was able to ride this route and stop and have several conversations with people about the changes yet this vehicle was still there there when I continued my journey northbound. Other images Burton Stone Lane today and links: #187860, #187861. Other image today and links: #187856.Enforcement:
Problem
enforcement
187858Photo #187858[Image taken 22.11.22] Crichton Avenue/Wigginton Road, York. Context: #187857. Note that the Iceland driver did not move into the ASL (bike box). Other image today and links: #187856.Road environment:
Good practice
road
187857Photo #187857[Image taken 22.11.22] Crichton Avenue/Wigginton Road, York. Motor traffic was solid here when I had a meeting at this location this morning: #187856. Drivers were intimidating other motorists. They were driving round motorists who were indicating left when they themselves wanted to turn right onto Wiggington Road. I watch traffic. I haven't seen anything like the situation playing out here this morning.
The driver in this car wanted to turn left. The person in the vehicle behind hooted until this person moved forward to let the driver behind manoeuvre round him (using the oncoming lane) to move into the middle of the junction parallel to the solid queue from the north side of this junction on Wigginton Road to the other side of the junction ie southbound. The driver and/or passenger in the Iceland van behind, wound down their window. They wanted to tell me, It was not his fault. The driver behind was hooting.
I'd seen it.
I'd heard it.
We are told 'You always have a choice'. But people who cycle are all too often intimidated into making unsafe (for them, usually) moves by motorists. So I empathised. But, by giving in to the motorist behind, this driver took up a road position that completely obstructed the pedestrian crossing.
Other image this issue today: #187858. Other image today and links: #187856.
Road environment:
Event
road
187856Photo #187856[Image taken 22.11.22] Crichton Avenue/Wigginton Road, York. This is the size and weight of vehicle that will turn into and out of Denning's Yard access if planning is granted for any development (see: #187304 and links). CYC must develop a whole area plan. This is needed so people who don't currently use it, perhaps because it is steep, congested, narrow, cambered, etc can and do. So people who want to walk, cycle, scoot, wheelchair but daren't, do. So there is space now and in the future for all active travel users.
I had a meeting at Denning's Yard access this morning. If there had been a camera team in attendance it would have looked set up. People who passed between Crichton Avenue and Foss Islands Path, in this order...
A older man who cycles with a trailer - a set-up he does all his shopping with. (I see him quite regularly.)
A young man pushing two children in a buggy.
A woman in a wheelchair.
A man with a white stick who, when I explained why I was there said: "They [motor vehicles moving in and out of the site] are not important. People are important [ie the people moving between Foss Islands Path/Wigginton Road pavement and Crichton Avenue."
A crocodile of children from a local primary school.
Even as we were seeing the most appalling driver behaviour I have ever seen in 40 years of watching traffic playing out behind us on Crichton Ave/Wigginton Road (perhaps as a result of this crash yorkmix.com/woman-dies-in-a-collision-between-a-bus-and-a-car-in-york/), my interlocutor - representing a local school - was trotting out:
- cyclists jump red lights
- you'll never get people out of cars;
- the problem is there's not enough space;
- you need to do one bit at a time;
- you can't do a big shop on a cycle.
My belief is there is systemic failure at CYC to be able to change from a 'cars first' ideology to a 'people are more important' ethos. There is no infra in the city that shows people who have busy lives, who are not aware of 'active travel' as a thing let alone the principles, who haven't been to any of our European neighbours or Portland, Oregon, for example, and therefore do not know that good design transforms lives, what is possible and how this positively changes lives - for all ages.
Even if you describe what could be possible the reply is: It can't be done here. (For the 'reasons' the person I met this morning gave.)
How can a city change for the better if it does not provide exemplar schemes to enable residents to experience and understand and want infra that supports people not their motor vehicles?
How can a city change if it does not engage:
[LTN 1/20 assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/951074/cycle-infrastructure-design-ltn-1-20.pdf
"3.3.6 [Scheme promoters should] actively seek out groups that may not be aware of the planned scheme and ensure they have the opportunity to comment. This may require a separate process, for example arranging meetings with local disability groups.
Such groups must be local primaries who:
- use the route for getting its pupils to and from places during the school day; and
- whose pupils, use it on their own or accompanied by family members to get to/from school and events there;
- visitors to the schools.
Denning's Yard access needs a whole-area vision.
York residents deserve a people first approach that makes their lives safer and easier to live, traffic-free, even if they never hear or see the phrase 'active travel'.
A final point:
I regularly ask, when responding to consultations, 'In future consultations. please ask people to look ahead 10, 20, 40 years to when they are vulnerable, can't or shouldn't drive, and need pavements and dropped kerbs, and take that into consideration when responding, not simply to reply based on how things are for them now.'
Looking at the consultations coming out of London over the past year or so I am struck by the inclusion - in the first paragraph - what percentage of people in Camden, Lambeth, Southwark, etc,... do not have access to a car.
The percentage in York is also significant. Including it makes people less ashamed of not having a car - the usual sentiment I pick up when asking people I talk to. I believe it also empowers people who do not have access to a car. And no less importantly, it raises awareness among residents:
- not everyone in York has access to a car so infra must include that 25 per cent, and
- life without a car is definitely possible. Which means, yes, you can do a family shop on a cycle: spend:#179013, #186763.
Other images here today: #187857, #187858. Other images today: #187859, #187860, 187861.
Road environment:
Problem
road
187829Photo #187829[Image taken 21.11.22] Tanner Row, York. The driver in the HQ Dental (www.hqdental.co.uk/) van has chosen to park on a contraflow cycle lane. The contraflow is towards the camera. The all-users route is away from the camera. The driver went into a building which is on the non contraflow side of the street. The driver therefore put people on cycles at risk by parking in the contraflow cycle lane rather than in the 'all users' lane; had to cross Tanner Row twice himself on foot; had to drive onto the other side of the street ie into the oncoming [cyclists] lane, had to drive off from the other side of the street ie out of (and necessarily therefore) to some extent along the advisory cycle lane. I had hoped the repainted contraflow markings might stop this behaviour by making the cycle lane clearer. Other image today: #187828.Obstruction:
Problem
obstructions
187828Photo #187828[Image taken 21.11.22] Tanner Row east of Rougier Street, York. 'John' is colourful. Context: #187750. Other image today: #187829.Road environment:
Problem
road
187803Photo #187803[Image taken 20.11.22] Burton Stone Lane, York. Rule 243 of the Highway Code says: DO NOT stop or park: opposite or within 10 metres (32 feet) of a junction, except in an authorised parking space. (www.gov.uk/guidance/the-highway-code/waiting-and-parking-238-to-252) Until a couple of years ago Burton Stone Lane was clear of pavement parking, verge parking and… parking here opposite the junction with Field View. Many people on cycles heading northbound from Bootham (or local streets) use the quieter, less polluted roads close to the railway to avoid Burton Stone Lane. They rejoin it here. The massive increase in the number of motor vehicles using Burton Stone Lane, parking on it, parking on the verges and pavements now makes even getting onto Burton Stone Lane difficult and fraught for cyclists. But also for mobility scooter and wheelchair users who can’t use the pavements – because they are parked on. Or can’t use the most direct route because there are no dropped kerbs or these are blocked by parked cars... Other image today and links: #187780.Enforcement:
Problem
enforcement
187802Photo #187802[Image taken 20.11.22] Burton Stone Lane, close to the junction with Clifton/Bootham, York. The newly replaced bench is perfectly positioned for watching drivers triggering the relocated VAS (see: #187798) moved as part of the works intended to reduce speeds: #187754. The illuminated VAS tells motorists they are exceeding the 20mph stated on the road signs they have passed and ignored. Siting a bin next to a bench is good practice. Other image today and links: #187780.Other:
Good practice
general
187801Photo #187801[Image taken 20.11.22] Burton Stone Lane, York. Damage to the dropped kerb and a considerable camber. As a pedestrian feel I am tipped towards the fast traffic on this busy narrow road. For some people it must be a considerable obstacle and/or a real hazard (and deterrent to going out). If you have a buggy, or use a mobility scooter or wheelchair, for example. Other image today and links: #187780.Other:
Problem
general
187800Photo #187800[Image taken 20.11.22] Burton Stone Lane, York. Pavement parking/obstruction of pavements continues to increase. I first encountered this instance while walking this (a regular) route last week. There are two motor vehicles on the drive of that property. Other image today and links: #187780.Enforcement:
Problem
enforcement
187799Photo #187799[Image taken 20.11.22] Burton Stone Lane, York. Surface water, fallen barricade. Other image today and links: #187780.Obstruction:
Problem
obstructions
187798Photo #187798[Image taken 20.11.22] Burton Stone Lane, York. Activated VAS northbound. Note the leaf litter on the pavement. Wet leaves are slippery and can clog wheels. Leaves in general obscure damage such as holes. Other image today and links: #187780.Enforcement:
Problem
enforcement
187797Photo #187797[Image taken 20.11.22] Burton Stone Lane, York. I asked this couple if I could take this photo. They agreed immediately. They are on the pavement on the east side and heading north. They are therefore facing the oncoming traffic. People heading south would not be able to see approaching traffic. Motorists drive fast along Burton Stone Lane. There are many elderly people, plus with electric vehicles being practically silent, pedestrians might not hear a vehicle behind them. Further there are no dropped kerbs either side of this obstruction. Someone in a mobility scooter or wheelchair or with heavy wheeled luggage or a shopping trolley or someone pushing a buggy would not be able to pass. Context: #187796. Other image today and links: #187780.General sign/notice:
Problem
signs
187796Photo #187796[Image taken 20.11.22] Burton Stone Lane, York. Completely obstructed pavement. The traffic calming scheme is supposed to deliver benefits for pedestrians as well as other non motorised users of the route. See obvious effect on pedestrians: #187797. Note the position of the (modest-sized) motor vehicle - easily straddling the speed cushion. Other image today and links: #187780.Route sign:
Problem
routesigns
187795Photo #187795[Image taken 20.11.22] Burton Stone Lane, York. Debris in the road and exposed metal rods on the splitter island (right). Context: #187761. Other image today and links: #187780Road environment:
Problem
road
187794Photo #187794[Image taken 20.11.22] Burton Stone Lane, York. Usable width 102 - 20 = 82. But I would not want to make contact with the speed cushion either so - 20 = 62cm. Other image today and links: #187780.Road environment:
Problem
road
187793Photo #187793[Image taken 20.11.22] Burton Stone Lane, York. Context and links: #187792. Other image today and links: #187780.Road environment:
Problem
road
187792Photo #187792[Image taken 20.11.22] Burton Stone Lane, York. Context: #187760. The usable width is 126 – (20 + 20) = 86cm. Other images this piece of infra today: #187793, #187794, and debris from damaged vehicles that hit this splitter island: #187795. Other image today and links: #187780.Road environment:
Problem
road
187791Photo #187791[Image taken 20.11.22] Burton Stone Lane, York. People in mobility scooters (on pavement, right) have to battle with pollution, high vehicle speeds, narrow pavements and obstructions: #187759, #187796, #187800. Other image today and links: #187780.Road environment:
Problem
road
187790Photo #187790[Image taken 20.11.22] Burton Stone Lane, York. Note the cyclist on the pavement. For a possible explanation see: #187760. Other image today and links: #187780.Road environment:
Problem
road
187788Photo #187788[Image taken 20.11.22] Burton Stone Lane, York. Looking southbound towards the northern set of the measures (intended to calm traffic and improve the non motorised user experience) at either end of the ‘pound’. Context: #187753. Other image today and links: #187780.Road environment:
Problem
road
187787Photo #187787[Image taken 20.11.22] Burton Stone Lane, York. Northbound carriageway though taken looking southbound. Usable width for people on cycles: 115 - 20 = 95cm. But I would not want to touch the speed cushion so that's a further 20cm to deduct. Therefore the usable width is 75cm. Measurement southbound carriageway: #187786. Context: #187785. Other image today and links: #187780.Road environment:
Problem
road
187786Photo #187786[Image taken 20.11.22] Burton Stone Lane, York. Southbound. Usable width for people on cycles: 119 - 20 = 99cm. But I would not want to touch the speed cushion so that's a further 20cm to deduct. Therefore the usable width is 79cm. Measurement northbound carriageway: #187787. Context: #187785. Other image today and links: #187780.Road environment:
Problem
road
187785Photo #187785[Image taken 20.11.22] Burton Stone Lane, close to the junction with Avenue Road/Grosvenor Road, York. New speed cushions drivers simply straddle. Measurements: #187786, #187787. Overview: #187753. Other image today and links: #187780.Road environment:
Problem
road
187784Photo #187784[Image taken 20.11.22] Burton Stone Lane, York. Context and links: #187784. I don’t know if it was this driver who activated the VAS. But note the road position of this vehicle. Other image today and links: #187780.Road environment:
Problem
road
187783Photo #187783[Image taken 20.11.22] Burton Stone Lane, York. There are VAS's (vehicle activated speed signs) at this end of Burton Stone. They have been relocated as part of the traffic calming measures (overview: #187753). They are more often activated than not... including by the ambulance and police services - even when the vehicles are not displaying the blue lights that indicates they are responding to emergencies. Other image today and links: #187780.Enforcement:
Problem
enforcement
187782Photo #187782[Image taken 20.11.22] Burton Stone Lane, York. [Image taken 20.11.22] Burton Stone Lane, York. Width of southbound carriageway 300 – (20 + 20) = 260cm. Width of northbound carriageway: #187781. Other image today and links: #187780.Road environment:
Infrastructure
road
187781Photo #187781[Image taken 20.11.22] Burton Stone Lane, York. Original island with keep left symbol on bollard. Note it is a replacement. There’s the evidence of damage behind it. The width of the northbound (the image direction is southbound) carriageway here is 295 – (20 + 20 ) = 255cm. Width of southbound carriageway: #187782. Other image today and links: #187780.Road environment:
Infrastructure
road
187780Photo #187780[Image taken 20.11.22] Burton Stone Lane, York. Context: #187753. Just one set of 20mph signs that predate the new (installed week beginning 14.11.22) measures that are intended to reduce the speeding and improve the cycling, mobility scootering/wheelchairing and walking experience. My view of how this is working are made clear in my other images here today and previously - search on 'newlow' or see the links the 'context' image above. More images of the new measures today: #187781, #187782, #187783, #187784, #187785, #187786, #187787, #187788, #187790, #187791, #187792, #187793, #187794, #187795, #187796, #187797, #187798. Other images today: #187799, #187800, #187801, #187802, #187803.Road environment:
Infrastructure
road
187762Photo #187762[Image taken 18.11.22] Burton Stone Lane, York. Context this image: #187760. Context/overview and links for the traffic calming installed week beginning 14.11.22 see: #187753.Obstruction:
Problem
obstructions
187761Photo #187761[Image taken 18.11.22] Burton Stone Lane, York. Note the absence of the two wands. (Compare with the intact structure: #187754.) These were at either end of the splitter island but barely visible after dark. They have a reflective covering but I noticed it was insufficient when I passed by two nights before I took this image. A resident who lives opposite said the wands were ripped off by the passage of one of the four drivers that had not seen the island. (Image of debris: #187795.) On my previous visit (on foot, after dark) I thought the give way lines were too close to the island: the turning circle for a driver to miss the splitter island is very tight. Context/overview and links see: #187753.Road environment:
Problem
road
187760Photo #187760[Image taken 18.11.22] Burton Stone Lane, York. The Aboard is intended to give directions to road users that makes the street safer. But it obstructs the cycle channel. Plus, the sandbag has split creating a further hazard should someone be able to squeeze through – grit. View of the channel from the other direction: #187761. Cyclist managing to use the channel: #187762. Context/overview and links see: #187753.Road environment:
Problem
road
187759Photo #187759[Image taken 18.11.22] Burton Stone Lane, York. This junction box (?) reduces the already insufficient width of the pavement still further. You don't walk right alongside structures... More comments on the pavements here: #187758. Context/overview and links see: #187753.Road environment:
Problem
road
187758Photo #187758[Image taken 18.11.22] Burton Stone Lane, York. The interventions in #187753 but looking southbound. The width of the space between the kerb and the cushion is 120cm. The reason for taking this image though was the hedge. It is currently cut. Yet, this leaves just 93cm for a pedestrian (typical kinetic width 1m) next to a road where speeds are high and vehicles include buses, construction traffic and other long and wide designs. When Gillygate is closed (as it does periodically) motor vehicles of all kinds are re-routed along Burton Stone Lane. The pavements are far too narrow, hedges grow and can be bushy, making walking ever less attractive and option or even impossible, the growing season is lengthening. This scheme does not address the pedestrian experience or the hostile and hazardous environment for people on foot including walking with children or pushing them in buggies. Context/overview and links see: #187753.Road environment:
Problem
road
187757Photo #187757[Image taken 18.11.22] Burton Stone Lane, York. Comments on pavement width as per: #187755. Context/overview and links see: #187753.Road environment:
Problem
road
187756Photo #187756[Image taken 18.11.22] Burton Stone Lane, York. This local resident was happy to pose for a photo. He said he'd already written three emails to CYC about the new layout and would be writing another today. He is not actually moving and his pose is therefore slightly unnatural. However it serves to illustrate that the Aboard reduces the width of the pavement to less than the space a pedestrian requires (at least 1m when moving) and that you need to turn slightly to be able to pass without touching the sign. Further, crocodiles of pupils use these pavements. They are unprotected from motor traffic and pollution while they do so. Context/overview and links see: #187753.Other:
Problem
general
187755Photo #187755[Image taken 18.11.22] Burton Stone Lane, York. The Aboard is intended to make the road safer. It's pedestrians who need most protection here. 90cm is too narrow. You don't go right up to signs or walls. So the usable space is rather less than 90cm – see: #187756 for a pedestrian with shopping navigating the space. Context/overview and links see: #187753.Road environment:
Problem
road
187754Photo #187754[Image taken 18.11.22] Burton Stone Lane, York. The width here does not meet LTN 1/20 requirements. Table 5-3: Additional width at fixed objects Kerbs 61mm to 150mm high 200. So, the actual width of the cycle channel is 130cm. The usable width is 130 - (20 + 20) = 90. “Figure 5.2 shows the range of dimensions for cycles typically in use. It is important that infrastructure can accommodate the full range of cycles to ensure routes are accessible to all cyclists. Cycle trailers and tricycles are usually about 0.8m wide, but adapted cycles can be up to 1.2m wide. The cycle design vehicle referred to in this document represents a composite of the maximum dimensions shown in Figure 5.2 is assumed as 2.8m long and 1.2m wide.
The new measures went in week beginning 14 November 2022. These cushions replaced the previous tarmac ones. Drivers (even of the smallest vehicles) can and are simply straddling them – as they did previously. As they do everywhere there are speed cushions around the city positioned with space either side exactly where motor vehicle wheels run naturally. The new infra seems temporary. The components look as if they could be easily removed. Is this a trial? Context/overview and links see: #187753.
Road environment:
Problem
road
187753Photo #187753[NOTE: Riding Burton Stone Lane southbound at lunchtime on 21.11.22, ie in the opposite direction to the photo in this image, I realised a driver was trying to beat me to the new measures. Motorists will want to get there before me - or any wider, slower craft. And, due to the limitations on the width of BSL, the passing is likely to be closer than the 5ft given in the new Highway Code. The new layout increases the 'need' for motorists to pass someone on a cycle (possibly also a scooter, a mobility scooter and also the places this is going to happen ie what are effectively 'pinch points'. The segregation needs to continue the length of Burton Stone Lane. Short stages simply return you to the carriageway and increase - guarantee? - motorists cutting in on you when you do. The only place there is partial segregation - wands - but drivers do not cut in on you is Haxby Road #174334 because the wands are not instead of a separate lane but are alongside part of the advisory lane. So someone cycling is riding northbound on an advisory lane, goes through the additional light segregation - those wands - but when they exit they are still on an advisory cycle lane that becomes part of the offroad segregated route under the ring road to Haxby or you can turn left onto the Haxby Cycleway. Clearly, obviously, BSL is a further reminder that stop-start segregation increases the dangers and stress (and suppresses demand/likelihood of people cycling) rather than provides protection.]
[Image taken 18.11.22] Burton Stone Lane, York. ‘Traffic calming improvements’: Details on CYC site: democracy.york.gov.uk/%28S%28aw2b23jofoyuejfc1asnl055%29%29/ieDecisionDetails.aspx There is no warning at either end of the works: "New layout ahead". It needs them - to alert every road user. Not least as most drivers, likely regular users, speed along this route.
When I’m out with my chalks, measuring tape and camera, understandably it’s not always clear why I am measuring and photographing. And, understandably, there are occasions therefore when people quiz me. Opinions can differ on whether infra works. For the first time, as I was on Burton Stone Lane (BSL), two people spoke to me and immediately assumed I shared their views: These changes don’t work. They make it less safe. Are you going to send your pictures to the Council? Please do and thank you for doing so.
I’d happened upon the new infra on Wednesday night on my usual walk. The speed cushions were in. The traffic islands between the cycle channels and the rest of the carriageway were in. When the wands were in. But a couple of the cycle symbols had still to be painted onto the road. I was flummoxed. I could not see how it was supposed to work or how this would: a) slow traffic – which was supposed to be the point of the interventions; b) improve the pedestrian experience; c) make this part of BSL, at least, less ‘challenging’ for people on cycles.
The first things I noted were:
1) speeds seemed no lower – the additional VAS (vehicle activated sign) was illuminating as often as the previous one in the opposite direction used to. There are/as there were, previously, signs the full length of BSL between Bootham/Clifton and Field View advising drivers there’s a 20mph limit (see: #187780);
2) the wands on the splitter islands that separate the cycle channel from the all traffic lane, with a speed cushion, were invisible and the give way lines at the northern end of the southern-most set were very close to it – not enough room to manoeuvre to avoid it;
3) it was a long way from one end of the scheme to the other;
4) local residents were stopping, or their visitors/delivery drivers were stopping, in what on a canal would be call the pound (the navigable channel between locks). One stopped for perhaps 30 minutes. This made seeing what was happening in the pound and at the other end of the scheme difficult to impossible as the vehicles blocked the sightlines;
5) totally terrifying was the experience of drivers coming straight at me as I was walking on the pavement. To navigate the pound drivers must move to the ‘wrong’ side of the road. They were doing it at speed and, as this was at night, the lights were dazzling. This means that in addition to the fear (and it feels likelihood) of being struck by a wing mirror of a motor vehicle passing you in the direction you are walking, you are now also at risk of being struck from the front;
6) on a cycle (mobility scooter, scooter) you are 'removed' from the shared space - the pound - by the cycle channels. This means you cannot control the traffic behind you (as you are taught to do in cycle training) by riding assertively. You are rendered invisible or irrelevant. The person (let's be clear, the human) is removed from the equation as if to reinforce the rider/scooter/mobility scooter user is not part of the 'traffic'. I think the scheme reinforces what many drivers believe and sets active transport back decades;
7) the scene is set to physically and psychologically and visually/physically encourage and support drivers to close- and fast-pass people on cycles, scooters and possibly mobility scooters, too. The pound is short. The motorist must return to the left-hand side of the road before the give way markings ahead which will usually have other road users queueing. Or, there are other vehicles in the pound a driver must negotiate with. But the main message is (set by the road markings - those give ways - and the physical signs that state Give way to oncoming vehicles) 'clear the pound as soon as possible'. Driver speeds are already too high here: well above the 20 the road signs show. So which driver will wait patiently - and far enough back that it does not feel like intimidation or tail gating - behind someone who is doing say 8mph (my likely pace) or less (I imagine, in a mobility scooter)? Instead many/most will crowd the cyclist as both vehicles approach the entrance to the pound. Then the driver tries to pass while the cyclist is in the separated channel (where there is one) or if that doesn't work s/he speeds up to pass before the end of the pound. It was very unpleasant to watch a lorry driver come up behind a cyclist. The cyclist said it was intimidating. For anyone nearby (including residents) is was noisy. The revving engine... It is yet another experience that makes cycling in this city unsafe feeling (at the least) and unattractive to do and a further nuisance for residents.
The two people who spoke to me, who did not overlap so neither was repeating what he had heard the other say, "City of York Council says, It’s all fine because no-one has been killed." See below about designing for all (LTN 1/20). I said to the one who was emerging from his home alongside the new infra, I walked here two nights ago and said to my partner, if I lived here I’d be expecting, Bang! Bang! Bang! all the time as drivers crashed or hit the infra. The resident said, "The first Bang! was Wednesday night." (It must have been after I had gone.) "Last night in the [heavy] rain, there were three more." It seems the first motorist did not see the wand, and hit that and the splitter island, and the others followed. (I am not sure if it was at the same or different times.) "Three vehicles were damaged in the same evening," he said.
LTN 1/20 (www.gov.uk/government/publications/cycle-infrastructure-design-ltn-120) has five core principles: 1.5.2 Networks and routes should be Coherent; Direct; Safe; Comfortable and Attractive. 1.5.3 Inclusive design and accessibility should run through all five of these core design principles. Designers should always aim to provide infrastructure that meets these principles and therefore caters for the broadest range of people. Design should begin with the principle that all potential cyclists and their machines should be catered for in all cycle infrastructure design.
1.5.4 Infrastructure must be accessible to all and the needs of vulnerable pedestrians and local people must be considered early in the process to ensure schemes are supported locally in the long term. The Equality Act 2010 requires public sector authorities to comply with the Public Sector Equality Duty in carrying out their functions. This includes making reasonable adjustments to the existing built environment to ensure the design of infrastructure is accessible to all.

Figure 1.1: Core design principles

DO Cycle networks should be planned and designed to allow people to reach their day to day destinations easily, along routes that connect, are simple to navigate and are of a consistently high quality.

DO Not only must cycle infrastructure be safe, it should also be perceived to be safe so that more people feel able to cycle.

DO Comfortable conditions for cycling require routes with good quality, well maintained - smooth surfaces, adequate width for the volume of users, minimal stopping and starting and avoiding steep gradients.

1.6 Summary Principles include:
Cycle infrastructure should be accessible to everyone from 8 to 80 and beyond: it should be planned and designed for everyone. The opportunity to cycle in our towns and cities should be universal.

Cycle infrastructure should be designed for significant numbers of cyclists, and for non-standard cycles. Our aim is that thousands of cyclists a day will use many of these schemes. We also want to see increasing numbers of cargo bikes to replace some van journeys. Cycle routes must be accessible to recumbents, trikes, handcycles, and other cycles used by disabled cyclists.
I could have quoted much more. This design is a new low in York infra for all non motorised users. It also creates hazards for drivers though perhaps less so for those who drive at 20mph or less.
Other images here today:
#187754, #187755, #187756, #187757, #187758, #187759, #187760, #187761, #187762.
Images from 20.11.22:
#187780, #187781, #187782, #187783, #187784, #187785, #187786, #187787, #187788, #187790, #187791, #187792, #187793, #187794, #187795, #187796, #187797, #187798.
Images from 22.11.22:
#187859, #187860, #187861.
Images from 27.11.22: #188030, #188032, #188033, #188034, #188035, #188036.
Pre-change image and links:
#182419.
Road environment:
Problem
road
187752Photo #187752[Image taken 17.11.22] York Explore, Library Square, York. Cosmo. Context and links: #187750Other:
Event
general
187751Photo #187751[Image taken 17.11.22] Peasholme Green/The Stonebow, (Hiscox Building/The Black Swan/Hungate development), York. Context and links: #187750. Will Cyril return? He was subjected to a dip on Monday night: yorkmix.com/york-rescue-boat-team-pull-the-nutcracker-figure-out-of-the-foss/ UPDATE: 23.11.22 When I rode through Hungate at 15.00 there was no nutcracker. On my return 30 minutes later Cyril was being reinstated - with, I was told - additional security.Other:
Event
general
187750Photo #187750[Image taken 17.11.22] Peasholme Green/The Stonebow, (Hiscox Building/The Black Swan/Hungate development), York. ‘Cyril’ is one of ten nutcrackers in an eponymous trail: www.visityork.org/events/york-nutcracker-trail I have a complete comprehension failure. Why? Because it seems they are all the same – unpainted. [UPDATE: See link to 'John' below.] They also only have one function. Nutcrackers open. So why can't you engage or interact with them? Perhaps put rubbish into them? As it is they feel like clutter. I'm likely sore because once when I asked for signage to support active travel - Narrow lanes. Do not overtake cyclists - it was been knocked back because the signs would constitute "clutter". Plus it feels as if this city does so many things on the cheap and the results look tawdry. I’d feel gulled if I were a tourist – of any age. Where’s the fun if they are colourless clones? The annual ice trail (www.visityork.org/york-ice-trail), by contrast, is worthwhile – for all ages. Each design is different. Each shows skill. Some are humorous. Plus they change… when temperatures climb. Location of Cyril: #187751. Other images in the trail: Cosmo, #187752, John: #187828, Lancelot: #187880,Other:
Infrastructure
general
187717Photo #187717[Image taken 14.11.22] Foss Islands Path, York. (Near the bridge over the River Foss.) [NOTE: Position approximate. No street view at this location] Context and link: #187716.Pothole:
Problem
potholes
187716Photo #187716[Image taken 14.11.22] Foss Islands Path, York. (Near the bridge over the River Foss.) [NOTE: Position approximate. No street view at this location] Today, a very gloomy, misty day, the expansion gap was completely obscured by leaves. I brushed them aside as I think it’s a hazard even when it’s exposed. It’s 3cm across. The chalk measurement – also 3cm – to the left is the difference in the height – the upstand - of the tarmac of the path and the metal plate at right angles to the expansion gap. The location of these plates and gaps: #187717. Other image nearby today: #187715.Pothole:
Problem
potholes
187715Photo #187715[Image taken 14.11.22] Foss Islands Path, York. (Near the bridge over the River Foss.) [NOTE: Position approximate. No street view at this location] What was a muddy desire line to/from the (high level) Foss Islands Path and the River Foss (low level) is now a formal, paved route. Albeit with a noticeable incline. And the new path has a name: Foss Fairy Trail. Other images – expansion gap hazard and the location thereof - here today: #187716, #187717.Route sign:
Infrastructure
routesigns
187703Photo #187703[Image taken 13.11.22] Co-op, Campleshon Road, York. I’m in favour of community notice boards. But who is this Co-op one aimed at? If the wider community, are people going to find it? And look at the size of the text... Not large enough for a noticeboard. Other images here today and links: #187693.Cycle parking:
Problem
cycleparking
187702Photo #187702[Image taken 13.11.22] Co-op, Campleshon Road, York. The roundtopped Sheffield racks – I think flattopped Sheffields offer more support and more locking surface area – are not well positioned. One is in front of a louvre. Is this intended as an exit? If a wide cycle or a group sharing locks used that end rack, this could obstruct the louvred door. The other end rack is in front of a defibrillator. Again, if a wider cycle or a group sharing locks used the rack, this would obstruct the emergency exit. Context and links: #187693.Cycle parking:
Problem
cycleparking
187700Photo #187700[Image taken 13.11.22] Co-op, Campleshon Road, York. Sheffields to one side - not visible, not signposted, nowhere near - the new Co-op. Perhaps they support short-stay cycle delivery to the residents? But is this a residents entrance? If so, could they be used for short stays by residents or their visitors? They are not useful for customers of the Co-op or cycle food collection couriers picking up food or other items from there. Context and links: #187693.Cycle parking:
Problem
cycleparking
187699Photo #187699[Image taken 13.11.22] Co-op, Campleshon Road, York. Car parking spaces directly opposite the entrance to the Co-op. Reason for inclusion: #187698. Context and links: #187693.Car storage:
Problem
carstorage
187698Photo #187698[Image taken 13.11.22] Co-op, Campleshon Road, York. There are racks… up steps. (No drop kerb from the road to get to them.) Nowhere near the Co-op entrance. No signage to help people find them. There’s disabled car parking directly opposite the shop entrance. How is it that in 2022, and in York – a city that has had an ‘all ability’ cycle outlet for decades’ – there is still no understanding that disabled people/the elderly, people with young children cycle and need provision close to the entrance to their destination? Context and links: #187693.Cycle parking:
Problem
cycleparking
187697Photo #187697[Image taken 13.11.22] Co-op, Campleshon Road, York. Rear of building. The totem trumpets parking but it means car parking. Context and links: #187693.Cycle parking:
Problem
cycleparking
187696Photo #187696[Image taken 13.11.22] Co-op, Clock Tower Way, Campleshon Road, York. The totem says 'Parking' but it doesn't mean cycle parking. Context and links: #187693.Cycle parking:
Problem
cycleparking
187695Photo #187695[Image taken 13.11.22] Clock Tower Way, junction with Campleshon Road, York. Private land notice. Context and links: #187693.Cycle parking:
Problem
cycleparking
187694Photo #187694[Image taken 13.11.22] Co-op, Campleshon Road junction with Clock Tower Way, view from Joseph Terry Grove, York. Co-op shop. Three cycles no cycle parking. Amazon box. Context and links: #187693.Cycle parking:
Problem
cycleparking
187693Photo #187693[Image taken 13.11.22] Co-op, Campleshon Road junction with Clock Tower Way, view from Joseph Terry Grove, York. Part of The Chocolate Works (hbd.co.uk/scheme/the-chocolate-works/), the former Terry’s factory site. Co-op (www.coop.co.uk/) opened 21.10.22. Press release: www.co-operative.coop/media/news-releases/co-op-serving-up-new-store-this-week-at-the-chocolate-works-york. Note the “customer car parking”. There are two disabled spaces and 8 non-defined car parking spaces. There’s no cycle parking. A member of staff arrived on his very chunky cycle. He said staff put their cycles "in the store room”. Another member of staff came out to meet the first one. She said Co-op knows cycle parking is needed; that there was cycle parking in the planning application; and it's now with CYC to resolve. This document planningaccess.york.gov.uk/online-applications/files/44F81574F7F755E1861B672AC51013B6/pdf/22_00881_ADV-LOCATION___PROPOSED_SITE_PLAN-2473034.pdf has a note “Cycle parking to be moved.” p2 of planningaccess.york.gov.uk/online-applications/files/396A80BF713E277AEB733CD9409BDF1E/pdf/22_00881_ADV-COMBINED_DRAWINGS-2501556.pdf shows the racks in their current location. It looks as if the planning application is 14/01716/FULM: “Erection of 229 dwellings comprising 79 houses and 150 apartments in six no. blocks with associated infrastructure (Phase 2)” and “Application Received Tue 22 Jul 2014”. But I could not find which block Hallmark House is/was to find more detail. There's no provision for food/grocery collection couriers to be able to secure their cycles - two wheel (conventional designs) or cargo rigs - while they pick up orders. Other images this subject here today: #187694, #187695, #187696, #187697, #187698, #187699, #187700, #187702, #187703. Other image today and links: #187688.Cycle parking:
Problem
cycleparking
187692Photo #187692[Image taken 13.11.22] Campleshon Road, junction with Clock Tower Way, York. Further down the road is a set of three speed cushions goo.gl/maps/QPTbz9zkpacc9YGT8 On a cycle the spaces enable you to continue without deviation to be able to avoid the rises. It is motorists who have to slow down. This set of two mean drivers can straddle them and few have to reduce their speed. People on cycles or with trailers have to change their road position to navigate them. This is infrastructure that makes cycling hazardous, non-intuitive, uncomfortable while most drivers are not inconvenienced at all. Other image today and links: #187688.Road environment:
Problem
road
187691Photo #187691[Image taken 13.11.22] Campleshon Road, York. Tier hire e-cycles and e-scooters. Tier overview page: #164663. Other image today and links: #187688.Bike share:
Infrastructure
bikeshare
187690Photo #187690[Image taken 13.11.22] West Esplanade, York. Note the white vehicle parked parallel to the fence in the background. Other image this issue today and links to context and all other images from today: #187689.Enforcement:
Problem
enforcement
187689Photo #187689[Image taken 13.11.22] West Esplanade, York. Content this notice: #187234. Context: #185486. Other images this issue today: #187690. Other image today and links: #187688.Enforcement:
Problem
enforcement
187688Photo #187688[Image taken 13.11.22] West Esplanade, York. Other images here today: #187689, #187690. Other images Campleshon Road today: #187691, #187692. Co-op Campleshon Road: #187693, #187694, #187695, #187696, #187697, #187698, #187699, #187700, #187702, #187703.Cycle parking:
Problem
cycleparking
187687Photo #187687[Image taken 12.11.22] Stirling Road, York. Location of cycle parking in relation to the leisure facility - tenpin (www.tenpin.co.uk/our-locations/york/bowling/) - I assume they are intended to support. But no sign alerting people there is cycle parking and where it is. Context and links: #187685.Route sign:
Problem
routesigns
187686Photo #187686[Image taken 12.11.22] Stirling Road, York. Low key cycle parking provision. I’ve cycled past these a few times without noticing them. I’d like to see ‘Cycle parking’ above them in large type on a large sign. And signposting to cycle parking provision. For example doublesided and using the supports of that massive sign on the road/on this approach next to them. Nudging and enabling. Context and links: #187685.Cycle parking:
Good practice
cycleparking
187685Photo #187685[Image taken 12.11.22] Stirling Road, York. Sheffield stands. Under cover. Space 'head'/'in front' of the supports (ie between the rack and the wall). Close-ish to the entrance of the bowling alley: tenpin (www.tenpin.co.uk/our-locations/york/bowling/). End spaces. But still, for the spaces between the uprights, 100cm (97/96cm) rather than 120cm that is more comfortable, convenient and practical. And there may be families or friends who will share locks and therefore need more space. Other images here today: #187686, #187687.Cycle parking:
Good practice
cycleparking
187674Photo #187674[Image taken 11.11.22] Alder Way, New Earswick, entrance/exit Bootham Stray. This woman and her child in a trailer were off to the pool at New Earswick (www.friendsofnewearswickpool.co.uk/). We were off to the cafe (newearswickfolkhall.com/catering/) in the library. I was able to support her cycle and roll it forward while she lifted the trailer with its human load. Barriers around the city are being removed (see: was #186594, now #186591; was: #180450, now: #182073) but the process is so slow. This barrier (see: #173450) at New Earswick needs to be one of the next to go.Obstruction:
Problem
obstructions
187655Photo #187655[Image taken 10.11.22] Burton Stone Lane, junction with Garth Terrace, York. I believe this is the information board for: #187653. The information boards are clear and easy to find. Other image today and links: #187649.General sign/notice:
Good practice
signs
187654Photo #187654[Image taken 10.11.22] Ratcliffe Street, junction with Haughton Road, York. Context and links: #187653. Other image today and links: #187649.General sign/notice:
Event
signs
187653Photo #187653[NOTE: 21.11.22 This sign - and another at the junction of Haughton Road and Field View - needs now to be removed. The works have finished. I will email to request this.] [UPDATE: At 16.15 this sign was still in this position and obstructing the pavement. I chased by email. When I passed again at 17.00 it had been moved into the road.] [UPDATE: I reported this obstruction by email at 16:17. I received a reply at 16:26: "Thanks for your email, I have spoken with the site manager who will speak with the traffic management company and arrange to have them positioned correctly."
[Image taken 10.11.22] Ratcliffe Street, junction with Haughton Road, York. Utilities are required to leave a minimum of 1m to enable wheelchair users to continue to use pavements safely. Between the sign and the wall capping there is just 45cm space. Between the frame and the wall is just 75cm space. I'm not sure even some of the dogs in this area will fit through the lower gap. This sign from the other side: #187654. And the company I believe it is connected to: #187655. Other image today and links: #187649.
Route sign:
Event
routesigns
187652Photo #187652[Image taken 10.11.22] Deangate, York. Flyparked Tier e-cycle. Despite the two lots of cycle parking within a few metres this hire e-cycle has been left on the side of the road. If it fell, it would be a hazard. Tier products overview: #187652. Other image today and links: #187649.Bike share:
Problem
bikeshare
187651Photo #187651[Image taken 10.11.22] Coppergate junction with Nessgate, York. (And the sign in the background indicated by the arrow - Spurriergate junction with Nessgate.) Context and links: #187649.General sign/notice:
Good practice
signs
187650Photo #187650[Image taken 10.11.22] Station Rise, York. This sign is not facing the traffic. So it is not doing its job. But it is not causing a hazard... Context and links: #187649.General sign/notice:
Problem
signs
187649Photo #187649[Image taken 10.11.22] Station Road, York. Compare the visibility of this events sign with this one from 2021: #175806. And consider the effect of putting it on (existing) poles rather than on the pavement (compare with this image also from today: #187653). Positioning them off the foothpath/cycle route/road is much safer for all. And, I think, more effective. There are diversions in my area. I passed two fallen A boards signing the temporary route. Except they weren’t because they had fallen over. Which means they were (are) obstructing the pavement and creating a trip hazard. Whereas although this one #175640 is not doing its job – it’s facing the wrong way – it is not creating a hazard unlike this one from 2021: #175640. Other images this topic today: #187650. Other images today: #187651,#187652, #187653, #187654, #187655.General sign/notice:
Good practice
signs
187632Photo #187632[Image taken 9.11.22] Motor traffic-free link route between Foss Islands Road and James Street, York. (Looking towards James Street.) [NOTE: No street view at this location.] You can now see the zebra crossing - and who is using it and what direction they are crossing in. Other image here today and links: #187630.Cycleway:
Infrastructure
cycleways
187631Photo #187631[Image taken 9.11.22] Motor traffic-free link route between Foss Islands Road and James Street, York. (Looking towards James Street.) [NOTE: No street view at this location.] Foliage has been cut back. This gives route users sight of people approaching over the zebra crossing on the left. Their presence and trajectory alerts other route users to the likelihood of there being a route across the path and that people could therefore also emerge from the right. Context: #182119. Other image here today and links: #187630.Cycleway:
Infrastructure
cycleways
187630Photo #187630[Image taken 9.11.22] Motor traffic-free link route between Foss Islands Road and James Street, York. (Looking towards James Street.) The foliage that restricted the usable width of this route has been cut. Context: #183671. Other images this subject here today: #187631, #187632. Other image here today and links: #187619.Cycleway:
Infrastructure
cycleways
187629Photo #187629[Image taken 9.11.22] Crichton Avenue/Denning’s Yard Access/Wigginton Road, York. 5.5.4 in LTN 1/20 (assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/951074/cycle-infrastructure-design-ltn-1-20.pdf) reaffirms that if there is a vertical structure next to a facility, you deduct a set amount depending on the height of that structure. "5.5.4 Where a cycle track is bounded by a vertical feature, people will not be able to use the entire width as they will naturally be wary of riding immediately next to walls and kerbs. Designers should provide additional width as shown in Table 5-3 [Table 5-3: Additional width at fixed objects]. In this case the vertical structure is a wall perhaps up to 1m tall. The advice is to deduct 0.5m for "Vertical feature above 600mm high". But, on the other side is a kerb. The advice for this is "Kerbs 61mm to 150mm high 200mm." Therefore the usable width of the pavement is 118cm - (50cm + 20cm) = 48cm. Context and links: #187621. Image this position in other direction: #187628.Road environment:
Problem
road
187628Photo #187628[Image taken 9.11.22] Crichton Avenue/Denning’s Yard Access/Wigginton Road, York. Space requirements for pavement users 'Typical footway widths for people walking' : www.sustrans.org.uk/for-professionals/infrastructure/sustrans-traffic-free-routes-and-greenways-design-guide/sustrans-traffic-free-routes-and-greenways-design-guide-contents/2019-design-guidance/part-2-design-details/6-space-requirements The table shows the minimum space required. This path does not meet them. Plus there is a high wall (and a long drop) to one side and a very busy road with very narrow single lane carriageways used by construction and other huge motor vehicles on the other. With no protection for pavement users. Image this position in the other direction: #187629. Context and links: #187621.Road environment:
Problem
road
187627Photo #187627[Image taken 9.11.22] Crichton Avenue/Denning’s Yard Access/Wigginton Road, York. Image this position in other direction: #187626. Usable width 126cm - (50cm + 20cm) = 56cm. [Explanation: #187629.] Context and links: #187621.Road environment:
Problem
road
187626Photo #187626[Image taken 9.11.22] Crichton Avenue/Denning’s Yard Access/Wigginton Road, York. Image this position in the other direction: #187627. Context and links: #187621.Road environment:
Problem
road
187625Photo #187625[Image taken 9.11.22] Crichton Avenue/Denning’s Yard Access/Wigginton Road, York. Step out, wheelchair out, cycle out from here and your back is to any drivers turning into Denning's Yard access by accident or design. And the vehicles may include construction lorries – explanation: #187304. From which 122cm offers no protection. But the usable width is even less: 122cm - 50cm = 72cm. [Explanation: #187629. NB The kerb here is flush so LTN1/20 assumes there is no danger of getting close to it. There is no table for Additional Reduction in Usable Width due to one or all of: a blind corner; no protection from motor traffic; proximity to very large motor vehicle] This position in the other direction and links: #187624. Other image today and links: #187619.Road environment:
Problem
road

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